Fatima: The Blood Spinners #2

fatima2-cover
9 Overall Score
Story: 10/10
Artwork: 9/10
Creativity: 9/10

Great art & story

Over way too quick


Last month Dark Horse Comics released the first issue of Fatima: The Blood Spinners, written and drawn by Gilbert Hernandez (Love and Rockets, Speak of the Devil). I loved it. While I normally enjoy Gilbert’s brother Jaime’s work more, especially his representations of women, which I feel are very accurate and show real women, not hyper-sexualized super heroines ala J. Scott Campbell, I fell for Fatima quickly. After all, it’s a zombie story where a drug is responsible for the legions of the living dead killing people left and right. Also, after the infamous Miami zombie story circulating around the Internet a few months ago, I can’t help thinking Fatima is clever and contemporary.

Where last issue focused on the origins of the drug Spin and the downfall of human civilization, this issue delves into the conspiracies behind it reaching the masses so quickly. Like the CIA’s involvement in drugs, the agency Fatima works for is the same, getting American citizens hooked on drugs. When Bill Hicks says the CIA are the biggest drug runners of the late 20th century he’s not exactly wrong; Hernandez is taking this and fictionalizing it for a zombie book. I’m cool with that.

Without providing too many spoilers this issue ends on an interesting note, where Fatima either finds herself 100 years in the future, hoping to avoid the zombie apocalypse, or possibly part of an institutional trap designed to kill anybody with insider knowledge. Also, like last issue, this installment is filled with violence and women dressed in overly tight clothing (a specialty of Hernandez). I can’t wait for the next issue, supposedly out in August, as the mysteries set up this issue will undoubtedly be answered and I’m sure with violent results.

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Author: Emmanuel Malchiodi View all posts by
Emmanuel Malchiodi is a freelance writer living in New York City but originally from Florida.